I want to ride along! What do I need to bring?

Want to come along? Great!  You'll need a bicycle, want a helmet, and crave some sustenance. New England rides are generally set up with regular stops for food and drinks. You can pack your own, or bring a wallet. Your call. For a complete listing of recommendations, reach out.

How fast do you ride?

I ride at a fairly medium cadence. What does that mean? My skinny tire friends smoke me. Expect to ride between 12 - 16 mph on average. Need to slow down? Take a break? We plan for that. Need more down time? You'll have a map with our route and can easily catch up with the pack. The bellecycle movement is more about slow, steady and spectacular than speedy. We also let you know the distance and challenge level beforehand. We want you to have fun.

Any training recommendations?

I have none. I ride early and often. I suggest everyone do the same, so far as it agrees with your doctor's advise. I don't train for any rides, but I average 70 miles a week for eight months of the year. But I would recommend every rider pay careful attention to the distance and challenge level and build up accordingly.

 

What kind of bike do I need?

Whatever bike is in your garage. Tours are, for the most part, designed for bikes with tires that have some tread and traction. We ride on roadway, bike paths, and encounter some sandy sections. Nighttime rides require both head and tail lights.
 

How much does it cost?

Rides in New England start at free and go up to $50 per ride for New England day trips. You'll get a route planner, a history lesson, when applicable, hours of photogenic fun, and a healthy pat on the back for doing something new and exciting. 
 

Are these rides supported?

New England rides are not supported.  But they are enhanced with riders who know their way around a frame like a doctor. Bring spare parts just in case, the most common of which of course is extra tubes.